University of Dubuque

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Summer School - Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

ART 112-Survey of Western Art II (3): Investigates key images in the history of art and architecture from the Renaissance to the Modern period (1400-2000) via slides, lectures, discussions, and readings. As an historical course, ART 112 not only considers the formal development of art but also presents each monument in the context of the society that created it. This course will focus on how a work of art reflects and is affected by the major cultural, political, and religious developments of its era. This course fulfills the Aesthetics B requirement. 

ART 367 – Digital Photography in Ireland and the Netherlands (3):  Digital photography has quickly become its own medium for artistic expression.  In this class, students will use digital cameras and computer software to create original works of art.  Students will be introduced to the following three areas: (1) Digital imaging technology (cameras and editing software), (2) Photo composition and lighting, and (3) Printing and electronic distribution.  Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on the artistic value of digital imaging. This course has a required lab which consists of an international study and travel component. DO NOT sign up for the course unless you are prepared to participate in the international portion. For fee information covering air and land transportation, check with Professor Alan Garfield at 589-3717 or agarfield@dbq.edu. This course is limited to 5 persons. This course fulfills the Aesthetics B and Global Awareness B requirements.

AVI 131- Basic Ground School (6): An introduction to private pilot flight operations including basic aircraft control, flight theory, national airspace system, radio navigation, aircraft performance, meteorology, cross-country operations, and human physiology. At the successful completion of this course, the student will have gained the aeronautical knowledge to take the FAA Private Pilot written examination. 

AVI 231- Ground School-Instrument (4): Theory and operation of flight instruments: instrument approach systems, airways systems, control systems, and communications. Instrument navigation and approach procedures. Preparation for FAA instrument written examination. Prerequisite: AVI 131. 

AVI 232 - Advanced Ground School (3): Theory of flight, advanced flight maneuvers, air navigation systems, meteorology, and other subjects in preparation for the FAA commercial pilot written examination. Prerequisite: AVI 231.

AVI 337-Airport Management (3):  The major functions of airport management:organization, zoning, adequacy, financing, revenues and expenses, evaluation and safety. A study of the airport master plan; federal, state, and local agencies; and the socioeconomic effect on the community.

AVI 346 – Airline Management (3): A study of scheduled air carrier and commuter organization and functions, to include passenger service, air cargo personnel management, labor relations, sales, finance, and public relations. Prerequisite: AVI 233

AVI 349-Aviation Safety and Accident Investigation (3): An introduction to aviation safety through the study of aircraft accidents. Designed to provide the basic principles of accident investigations, how accident reports are used in accident prevention, and methods for implementing strong aviation safety programs. Prerequisite: AVI 131 or AVI 233

AVI 387 - Aviation Internship (1-8): Aviation internship is an educational process that formally integrates a student's academic studies in aviation with on-the-job work experience. Students may apply up to six AVI intern credit hours toward the major. 

AVI 401 – Applied Aerodynamics (3): Principles of aerodynamic forces, aircraft performance and limitations, and longitudinal, lateral and directional stability and control. Low speed and high-speed aerodynamics with related transport design characteristics. Prerequisite: UDMA 150, and PHY151 or consent of the instructor (Cross-listed with PHY 401)

AVI 430 - CFI - Fundamentals of Instruction (2): To prepare advanced aviation students seeking a certified flight instructor rating with an understanding of the learning process and to develop the ability to organize materials, prepare lesson plans, use instructional aids, and to acquire teaching skills. Completion of the course will prepare students to take the FAA written examination on fundamentals of instruction. Prerequisite: AVI 23 

AVI 431 - CFI - Aeronautical Knowledge (3): To provide advanced aviation students with the aeronautical knowledge required to teach aviation-related material and be prepared to take the certified flight instructor FAA written examination. Prerequisite: AVI 232. 

AVI 432- Ground School- CFI Instrument (2): Designed for the CFI who wishes to be certified to conduct instrument flight instruction. Preparation for FAA CFI-instrument written examination. Prerequisite: AVI 430 

AVI 435 - Ground School- Multi-Engine (2): Aircraft systems and operation of multi-engine airplanes. Preparation for acquiring a multi-engine class rating. Prerequisite: AVI 231. 

AVI 487 - Aviation Internship (1-8): Aviation internship is an educational process that formally integrates a student's academic studies in aviation with on-the-job work experience. Students may apply up to six AVI intern credit hours toward the major. 

BAC 120 -Principles of Macroeconomics (3): This is a course in basic macroeconomic theory which is the study of the global and national economies as opposed to the study of the behavior of individuals or organizations. Topics in this class include issues such as international governmental policies, global allocation of resources, unemployment, the Federal Reserve, international perspectives of economic thought and governmental policies. Prerequisite: none This course fulfills the Global Awareness A requirement.

BAC 160 - Principles of Microeconomics (3): Introduction to microeconomics which is the study of the behavior of individuals and organizations. This course will focus on the overall topic of market exchanges and why people, organizations, governments, and nations work the way they do. Prerequisite: none 

BAC 201 -Principles of Management (3): This course is designed to prepare students to study management processes and to identify the skills necessary to develop and achieve organizational goals.  This is a basic course in the organizing activities of people in groups.  The emphasis is on organizational behavior, including the study of interpersonal behavior, motivation, group dynamics, and the methods of coordination, design, change, and adaptation within an organization.  Included in this class is the study of contemporary leadership and its impact on micro and macro organizational issues.  Prerequisite: none

BAC 241 - Principles of Financial Accounting (3): This course provides an introduction to accounting within the context of business and business decisions. The student will explore accounting information's role in the decision-making process and learn how to use various types of accounting information found in financial statements and annual reports. The course also introduces the procedural aspects of accounting via computer courseware simulating a manual accounting system. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CIS 101 and UDMA 111 or 112, both with a C or better. 

BAC 242 -Principles of Managerial Accounting (3): A study of the managerial uses of accounting information. Students learn how managers use tools such as cost volume-profit analysis and break-even analysis to control a business entity. The role of budgeting and variance analysis is emphasized. Students use computer software to prepare increasingly challenging managerial accounting spreadsheets. Prerequisite: BAC 241. 

BAC 262-Personal Financial Stewardship (3): This course is designed to make students better financial stewards in their personal and professional environments. The details of tax forms and exemptions, charitable donations, financial planning, and financial markets will be explored. Additionally issues regarding compensation, tax deferred accounts, and insurance options will be covered as well as credit options, how to finance major purchases and budgeting. Prerequisite: UDMA111 or UDMA112

BAC 280 -Principles of Marketin(3): Study of concepts and principles in the delivery of goods and services to consumers in a business to business and business to consumer settings. Focuses on the four-P's of marketing: Products, Price, Place, and Promotion of products. Concepts are applied by students to their personal buying behaviors as well as by developing a marketing plan for a product.  Prerequisite: none.

BAC 300 - Principles of Finance (3): This course is emphasizes the financial decision-making. An emphasis on the analysis of the sources and use of funds, fundamental valuation concepts, short and long term financing and working capital management and the application thereof. Additionally the foundations of capital markets and investing will be discussed. Analysis is accomplished through the use of ratio analysis and statistical calculation and is applied to relevant accounting concepts and principles. Pre-requisites: UDMA 111 or 112, BAC110, BAC120, and BAC160.   

BAC 304-Human Capital (3): A survey of managerial practices with respect to the management of the human resource function and an introduction to the topic of human resource management as an occupational choice. Major areas of inquiry include recruitment and selection, training and development, compensation and benefits administration, and work force integration and maintenance.  Prerequisite: BAC 201

BAC 320-Risk & Operations Management (3): This course is designed to provide students with a working understanding of operations management, decision-making strategies and the processes employed to determine risk in operations. This course will address management problems we observe in firms such as capacity constraints, quality assurance, inventory control, mitigating risk and scheduling. Prerequisites: BAC 120, BAC 300; and UDMA 111 or UDMA 112

BAC 324-Leadership & Motivation (3): Applies organizational behavior theories as well as applied concepts and skills to leading and motivating individuals and groups in organizational environments. Integrates classical and contemporary models of leadership and motivation as well as ethical issues found in current leadership and motivational applications. Prerequisite: BAC 201

BAC 340 – Effective Communication in Business (3): Direction in fundamental forms and styles for common types ofbusiness reports and correspondence. Through literature and case studies, the course confronts students with various problems commonly encountered in business. Prerequisite: ENG 102. This course fulfills the World View 3 requirement.

BAC 359- Economics of Sports in Media (3):  This course will look at the economics of professional sports.  Salary caps, luxury taxes, city subsidies for sports stadiums and a host of other related issues will be addressed.  A working understanding of microeconomic theory and a willingness to read are helpful.

BAC 359 – Excel for Business (1): Introduction to basic business applications in Excel. Hands-on lab work will emphasize the development of Excel skills that are used daily by professionals working in business.

BAC 359 – Advanced Excel for Business (1):  Emphasizes advanced business applications using Excel.  Hands-on lab work will focus on the analysis and manipulation of complex business data.

BAC 421- Business Law (3): Explores the legal, ethical, and social responsibility as well as selected regulatory issues of business. Includes a study of legal principles governing business ransactions as well as the study of administrative law and contracts. Also explores ethical aspects of preparing contracts and the social impact that organizations and their products or services can have on society. Prerequisite: 7th semester standing or consent of the Instructor

BAC 487-Internship in Business (3-9): Paid or volunteer work experience with a for-profit or non-profit organization conducted in conjunction with a faculty facilitator. Prerequisite: 6th, 7th or 8th semester standing.

BIO 111 – Biological Science (4): A consideration of biology as a dynamic, unified science of life, emphasizing general principles.  This course fulfills the General Education science requirement.

BIO 125 – Population, Resources, and Environment (3): The course provides an overview of environmental problems. Emphasis is placed on the interdependence, diversity, and vulnerability of the earth’s life-support systems. Covers major aspects of the interrelated problems of increasing human population, decreasing resources and increasing stress on the environment. This course fulfills the Stewardship requirement.

BIO 136-General Botany and Lab (4): A study of the major groups of the plant world with an emphasis on plant origins, evolution, diversity, structure, biochemistry, and genetics. Phylogenetic systematics and classification will be introduced. Microscopic, physiological, biochemical, genetic, and molecular techniques will be used in the study of the morphology, physiology, reproduction, ecology, and biochemistry of plants, plant tissues, and seeds.

BIO 359 Science Research (1): Contact the instructor.

BIO 387/487-Internship (1-3): Participation in activity outside the classroom under the direction and guidance of a professor who teaches in the area in which astudent seeks credit hours.

CCS 101-Cross-Cultural Study in the United States (1): One-credit courses in Cross-Cultural Studies are offered in the Dubuque area or at various locations in the U.S. This course fulfills the Global Awareness B requirement.

CGR 359 – Z Brush (3): The purpose of this course is to introduce students to ZBrush, the digital sculpting software that combines 2.5D and 3D based modeling, texturing, and painting. The course will discuss and demonstrate the ZBrush interface and then migrate to the actual modeling of objects and characters. We will then progress to the texturing and painting of those assets. Finally, the students will learn how to export and then import the newly created objects and textures into an external 3D graphics application. ZBrush is an industry standard software package that is used in modeling pipelines from game development to feature films.

CGR 487-Internship (1-3): Experience and training in field related to computer graphics/ interactive media under the supervision of a working professional. The course enables the student to integrate classroom preparation with workplace applications. The student must contribute a block of time each week of the term equal to twice the number of credit hours included in the internship. Maximum of 12 credit hours may be earned and applied to the Computer Graphics/Interactive Media major. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and permission of the department.

CIS 101 - Introduction to Computers (3): Introduction to basic computer concepts. Topics include computer networks, the Internet and the World Wide Web, systems software, applications software, and computer hardware. Hands-on lab experience with word processing, electronic spreadsheets, database management systems, and presentation software.This course satisfies the University of Dubuque computer literacy requirement. 

CIS 103 – Computer Applications in Business (3): This course satisfies the general education technology requirement and may be taken instead of CIS 101. Students will learn how to use various software programs as they are applied in a business environment. Topics will include e-mail, Internet skills, ethical uses and abuses of technology, word processing, spreadsheets, database systems, graphical presentation applications, and software integration. Microsoft Office 2007 products will be used. A six month copy of Microsoft Office 2007 is available through the purchase of the required text. This course satisfies the University of Dubuque computer literacy requirement.

CIS 215 – Programming I with Java (3): This course covers the basics of programming structure and design. Students will learn to create, compile, and run working programs, use selection structures, repetition structures, invocation structures, exception handling and IO; methods, arrays, objects and classes; strings, using GUI programming. Prerequisite: CIS 101 or 103 and UDMA 112.

CIS 359 – Ethical Hacking (3): This course will introduce students to the world of penetration testing and ethical hacking.  The class will begin with an overview of Backtrack Linux- a specialized Linux distribution widely used by information security people around the world.  Basic tools included in Backtrack will be discussed.  The bulk of the time will be spent using the Metasploit framework and wifi security tools.  The class will conclude with a trip to Las Vegas for the DefCon 20 hacking conference which is scheduled for July 26-29, 2012. Approximate fee for the trip: $1,000 – 1,500. Prerequisites: CIS338 or CIS304 or instructor permission. 

COM 101-Basic Communication (3): Exposes students to the fundamental concepts and skills needed for success in a variety of communication situations. Students demonstrate competence through oral presentations, quizzes and written tests. Students learn to make effective informative and persuasive presentations before groups. This course fulfills the general education requirement.

EDU 119- Human Relations Skills for Teachers (3): Examines the interaction of the student's cultural background with racial, gender, legal and ethical issues; the educational setting and wider social forces. Emphasizes how to learn attitudes and behavior that overcome prejudices or discrimination in interpersonal relationships and in instructional methods and materials. Writing intensive. Open to students even if they have not been admitted to Teacher Education. This course fulfills the Social Development requirement.

EDU 220 – Foundations of Early Childhood (3): This course provides an overview of the philosophies and history of early childhood education and their impact on the curricula.  The course defines childcare settings and terminology in the field (ie: day care, preschool, family day care home) and goals associated with each.  Students will examine the role of early childhood educator, related career fields, career ladders, and professional ethics.  This course also provides an introduction to alternative assessment techniques, specifically observation strategies.

EDU 303 - Reading & Writing in the Content Areas (2): Knowledge and methodology for teaching reading and writing language and thinking in selected school content areas. Explores instruction strategies that can facilitate content area learning by reading. Applies current theory and research relative to reading and writing to classroom procedure. Writing intensive. 

EDU 306 - Children's Literature (3): Evaluation and utilization of various genres and elements of literature with focus on literature for children in grades K-6. Examines the different ways children can be involved in developing an appreciation forand an interest in literature. Emphasis on extensive reading and evaluation of titles appropriate to various grade levels. 

EDU 311 - Reading Assessment/Diagnosis (3): A study of the diagnostic and remediation process with particular attention to the selection, purposes, reliability, validity, administration, and appropriateness of assessment instruments designed to identify students who have reading deficits. Focuses on selection and implementation of reading assessment and instructional procedures. Various methods of diagnosing the strengths and weaknesses of the reader. Open only to students formally admitted to Teacher Education. Taken concurrently with EDU 312. Prerequisites: EDU 302, EDU 307, EDU 308 and EDU 309 

EDU 348 - Transitions for Mild/Mod Disabil 7-12 (3): The Transition course will examine the basics of transitioning, the movement from one life education experience to another. Many transitions occur during one’s life time, but one of the most significant is graduating from high school and entering the adult world. This course is designed to explore the time, life experiences, job related skills and variety of services needed for teaching middle and high school students with exceptional needs the skills to succeed the first years out high school.  The course will include basic curriculum, as to planning for different types of transition services, as to employment, community living opportunities and participation, evaluation and postsecondary education as required by Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA).

EDU 365 - Communication & Collaboration Partners. (3): Develops competency in understanding and communicating with families of students with disabilities and collaboration with related school and agency professionals. Focuses on the structure, need, and dynamics of  these families, types of communication and the fundamental strategies for consultation and collaboration. Pre-requisites: EDU 202, EDU 204, and EDU 206.

ENG 090- Introduction to College Writing (3): A course designed to assist students in developing the language and writing skills necessary for successful performance in college. Students earning a grade of C or better are eligible to enroll in ENG 101-Composition and Rhetoric. Students receiving a grade of C- or below in ENG 090 must repeat the course the next term the course is offered and prior to taking ENG 101.

ENG 101-Composition and Rhetoric (3): Direction in forming the habit of correct and fluent English through a considerable amount of reading and writing. No print textbook is required; however, students will need a digital camera with uploading capabilities for the course. Students are required to earn a C or better in ENG 101. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

ENG 112- Introduction to Literature (3): An introduction to the literary genres of fiction, poetry, and drama. Appreciation and understanding of literature are primary, but with continued emphasis on the skills of close, critical reading and writing that were developed in ENG 102, Prerequisite for most other literature courses. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in ENG 101. This course fulfills the Aesthetics A requirement.

ENG 230-Modern Grammar (3): An examination of language structure and usage from the perspective of traditional grammar and modern linguistics. This course is primarily designed to allow students to gain a conscious knowledge of English grammar and to provide students with the tools necessary for understanding language structure in order to analyze their own and others’ use of the language.

ENG 328-Environmental Literature (3): Students read literature focused on nature and environmental issues; field experiences create direct contact with the ecological subjects of the literature. Through field work in the natural environment, students participate in active experiences to test their reactions to the issues presented by important nature writers and environ-mentalists such as Thoreau, Muir, and Leopold. This course satisfies the World View 3 requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 112. (Crosslisted with EVS 328).

ENG 340 – Effective Communication in Business (3): Direction in fundamental forms and styles for common types ofbusiness reports and correspondence. Through literature and case studies, the course confronts students with various problems commonly encountered in business. Prerequisite: ENG 101. This course fulfills the World View 3 requirement.

ENG 358 – Adolescent Literature (3): Students will read widely in the field of adolescent literature (literature for and about the young adult), working towards a definition of the genre, critical standards for considering young adult texts, knowledge of modes and themes found in the literature, and an understanding of the place of this literature in middle and secondary school English programs. Currently either this course or EDU 306 is required of secondary English education majors, but this course is directly tailored to the needs of future high school English teachers.

ESC 214 – Meteorology (3): Structure and behavior of the atmosphere, elements of weather, meteorological instruments, principles of forecasting, work of the United States Weather Bureau, measurements, methods and applications of climatological data, weather types, statistical techniques in using climatological data, world pattern of climates.

EVS 328-Environmental Literature (3): Students read literature focused on nature and environmental issues; field experiences create direct contact with the ecological subjects of the literature. Through field work in the natural environment, students participate in active experiences to test their reactions to the issues presented by important nature writers and environ-mentalists such as Thoreau, Muir, and Leopold. This course satisfies the World View 3 requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 112. (Crosslisted with ENG 328).

EVS 359 – Environmental Science Research (1): Contact the instructor.

EVS 387 and 487 – Internship in Environmental Science: (2-3): Professional internship and field experience in a location removed from the University setting. This course allows the student to integrate theoretical concepts with practical applications, while working with environmental professionals. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

FLI 131 - Flight Training I (3): Preflight operations: starting, taxiing, takeoffs, and landings, airport traffic patterns, simulated emergencies, use of radio for communications, maneuvering at minimum controllable airspeed, stalls from all normally anticipated flight altitudes, and primary instruments. Introduction to advanced precision maneuvers. Preparation forthe private pilot license. 

FLI 132 - Flight Training - Commercial Cross-Country (2): Advanced navigation procedures and cross-country flying, day and night flying. Designed to meet aeronautical experience requirements for a commercial pilot license. Prerequisite: A VI 131. 

FLI 231- Flight Training - Instrument (3): Instruction in operation of aircraft solely by reference to instruments. Instrument pilot techniques and maneuvers in preparation for the FAA instrument examination. Prerequisite: FLI 132 

FLI 232 Flight Training – Commercial Maneuvers (2): Contact department chairperson for course description.

FLI 235 Fixed Wing Transition – Private Pilot (2): Designed to permit military and commercial helicopter pilots to obtain an airplane (fixed-wing) category rating. The course is designed to allow maximum application of the student’s powered flight experience and obtain the airplane category rating in the minimum amount of time. The course consists of a minimum of 20 flight credit hours. Prerequisite: Must possess current Private Pilot Rotary-Wing rating or better.

FLI 334 - Flight Training - Complex/High Performance Aircraft (2): A course for licensed pilots who need to stay current. Five hours of solo and/or dual flight training to improve proficiency on the private, commercial, and instrument level. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: Pilot's license and department approval. 

FLI 337 –Fixed-Wing Transition (Commercial/Instrument) (3): The purpose of this course is to permit military and other persons with helicopter commercial instrument ratings who have achieved a Private Pilot Airplane rating to upgrade that license to Commercial Instrument, Airplane, in the minimum required flight hours. Prerequisites: Current Commercial License, Rotary-Wing category; Helicopter Class Rating with instrument privileges, and a Private Pilot Airplane, Single Engine Land rating.

FLI 338 – Fixed Wing Transition (Instrument) (1): The purpose of this course is to permit military or other pilots with Private or Commercial Rotary-Wing Instrument ratings to obtain an Airplane Instrument rating. This course permits maximum application of power flight experience to meet FAR requirements and obtain the rating in the minimum of flight hours. Prerequisites: An Airplane Category Rating as well as a Helicopter Instrument Rating.

FLI 340 - Currency & Refresher (1): A course for licensed pilots who need to stay current. Five hours of solo and/or dual flight training to improve proficiency on the private, commercial and instrument level. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: pilot's license and departmen1 approval. 

FLI 431 - Flight Training-Certified Flight Instructor Airplane (CFI-A) (2): Flight qualification for flight instruction, maneuver analysis, evaluation and instructional techniques in preparation for FAA, CFl flight examination. Prerequisite: A VI 232 and FLI 334. 

FLI 432 - Flight Training-CFI Instrument (1): Flight qualification for conducting instrument flight instruction. Preparation for FAA, CFl instrument flight examination. Prerequisite: FLI 431. 

FLI 433 - Flight Training - CFI Multi-Engine (1): Flight qualification for conducting multiengine flight instruction with emphasis upon fundamentals. Preparation for FAA, CFl, multiengine flight examination. Prerequisite: FLI432. 

FLI 435 - Flight Training - Multi-Engine (2): Flight qualification in system and operation of multi-engine aircraft. Performance, flight techniques, systems management, night and emergency operation. Preparation for multi-engine flight examination. Prerequisite: A VI 435 and FLI 231. 

HEA 246 – Human Nutrition (3): Fundamentals of diet, exercise, metabolism, weight control and maturational development.

HEA 330 - Methods of Teaching Elementary Health (2): Goals, content, materials, and teaching strategies for planning and implementing a health education program in the elementary classroom. 

HEA 487-Internship (3-6): Supervised on-site practical experience in Health, Wellness & Recreation. Prerequisite: Senior Status.

MIL 181 - Military Science Leadership Practicum (4-6): A six-week summer program at Fort Knox, Kentucky, designed to provide leadership experiences to sophomores. Successful completion will qualify students to enroll into the ROTC Advanced Course. Prerequisite: departmental approval 

MIL 494-Leadership Practicum (4-6): A six-week summer program at Fort Lewis, Washington, designed to provide leadership development and opportunities for students participating in the Advanced Course. Prerequisite: departmental approval. 

PED 135 – Weight Training (1) – All activity classes provide instruction in history, rules, etiquette, equipment,  strategies, techniques and skills. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

PED 137 – Physical Fitness (1) - All activity classes provide instruction in history, rules, etiquette, equipment,  strategies, techniques and skills. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

PED 143 – Tennis (1) - All activity classes provide instruction in history, rules, etiquette, equipment, strategies, techniques and skills. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

PED 148 – Golf (1) - All activity classes provide instruction in history, rules, etiquette, equipment, strategies, techniques and skills. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

PED 300-Exercise Physiology (3): A study of the physiological bases of physical activity with emphasis given to the special effects of exercise on body function, health-related fitness, nutrition and sports performance. Prerequisite: PED 200

PED 330 –Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education (2): Goals, content, materials and teaching strategies for planning and implementing a physical education program. Curriculum issues, unit plan construction and lesson plan development.

PED 342 – Organization & Administration of Physical Education, Athletics & Recreation (3): Techniques and procedures for program management to include standards, policies, programs, budgeting, supervision and problems unique to physical education, athletics and recreation settings.

PED 359-Outdoor Summer Activities (1): Specialized in-depth study of various selected subjects and issues. May be used for workshop credit and preparation for nationally recognized certifications. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

PHL 214 – Environmental Perspectives (3): An investigation of the ways in which the natural world has been understood in various historical, religious and philosophical perspectives, and of the implications for how humans should interact with the environment.  The course emphasizes helping each student formulate a value perspective from which to evaluate human actions and policies concerning the environment. (Cross-listed as REL 214). This course fulfills the Stewardship and World View 3 requirement.

PHY 151-General Physics I with laboratory (4): The first semester of a one-year course usually taken by students majoring in biology, environmental science, aviation and other disciplines including health professions, earth science, and secondary education. Fulfills the core curriculum science requirement. This course provides students with a conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical and scientific skills. The first semester focuses on Newtonian mechanics, physics of fluids, heat and thermodynamics, wave motion, and sound. Prerequisites are UDMA 112 Algebra and knowledge of trigonometry, or a pre-calculus college course. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

PSY 110 - Introduction to Psychology (3): A survey of the major topics covered in the field of psychology. The student is introduced to concepts and theories in such areas as development, learning, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, therapy, and social behavior. This course fulfills the Social Development requirement.

PSY 119-Life Span Development for Non-Majors (3): This course will provide students with an understanding of the life-span development of human beings; stages from prenatal development to late adulthood, concluding with ‘death and grieving’. Biological, cognitive, and socio-emotional developmental theories will be presented and discussed. This course cannot be counted as part of the Psychology major.

PSY 210-Psychology of Adjustment (3): An examination of the problems faced in normal development and the strategies used in coping with the stresses these problems create. Prerequisite: PSY 110.

PSY 223-Adolescent Development (3): A survey of developmental changes characteristic of adolescence. Topics include identity, independence, gender, cognitive changes, and parent-child relationships.

PSY 351 – Theories of Personality (3): An examination of major personality theories emphasizing their important concepts and their utility in explaining and/or predicting behavior. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing required.

PSY 354 -Abnormal Psychology (3): A study of the major forms of psychopathology including  anxiety and stress reactions, depression and suicide, schizophrenia and personality disorders. Examination of theory and research on origins, symptoms, treatment, and prevention. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing 

REL 110 - Judeo-Christian Journeys (3): An introduction to representative people, stories, beliefs, and practices of Judaism and Christianity that have shaped both cultures and individual lives. The course draws from diverse branches of these traditions, including Jewish, Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Protestant traditions. The course does not presuppose that students have any particular religious beliefs or impose any particular religious beliefs on students, but rather seeks to introduce students to Jewish and Christian traditions that continue to have a profound impact on the world, and to stimulate each student to reflect individually upon his or her own spiritual or intellectual journey in light of resources from these traditions. No prerequisites.  This course fulfills the General Education requirement. 

REL 116-History of Christianity (3): An overview of the history of the Christian church from it beginning to the present.This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

REL 214 – Environmental Perspectives (3): An investigation of the ways in which the natural world has been understood in various historical, religious and philosophical perspectives, and of the implications for how humans should interact with the environment.  The course emphasizes helping each student formulate a value perspective from which to evaluate human actions and policies concerning the environment. (Cross-listed as PHL 214). This course fulfills the Stewardship and World View 3 requirements.

REL 359 Religion at the Movies (3): Students will view and analyze movies that develop the theme of “reconciliation”—reconciliation with God, self, and others.  Through film, we will examine barriers to reconciliation in society today, such as racial, familial, socio-economic, religious, and political divisions.  Theological readings will give insight on strategies for healing human brokenness from a religious perspective. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

RES 104 – Introduction to Research Writing (3): Students will conduct introductory research and write papers in three areas: the natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities.  Students will work closely with their professor and a reference librarian as they frame research questions, differentiate among various disciplines’ research techniques, explore and analyze scholarly and professional resources, and write clear, effective papers on topics in the three disciplines.  Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a minimum grade of C. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

SCJ 211-Criminal Law (3): A study of substantive criminal law; its origins, elements, foundational principles and supporting rationales, including review of state criminal code provisions, the model penal code, certain federal criminal statutes and supporting case law. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or SOC 112.

SCJ 233 – Juvenile Delinquency (3): A survey of the invention and history of delinquency in American society; description of the nature and extent of delinquency in the U.S.; an introduction to theories of delinquency; analysis of the relationship between delinquency and social and economic conditions and the sociology of the contemporary juvenile justice system.

SCJ 387/487- Criminal Justice Internship (1-6): Field experience in sociology or criminal justice. Consent of department chairperson required. 

SOC 111 – Introduction to Sociology (3): An introduction to the social, political and economic aspects of human societies. Basic concepts and principles are developed through the study of several societies with emphasis on American culture and its institutions. A prerequisite for most other sociology courses. This course fulfills the Social Development requirement.

SOC 112-Contemporary Social Problems (3): An introduction to such social issues as poverty, racism, immigration, prejudice and crime. Students will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of why and how social problems develop at national and global levels. By providing a frame of reference as well as theory for interpreting data and analyzing problems, alternative solutions and their possible consequences are explored. A prerequisite for many Criminal Justice courses. This course fulfills the Social Development requirement.

SOC 331-Social Stratification (3): Provides a critical and historical examination of contrasting theories and the thoughts of those who are justifying or attacking social inequality. Various aspects of social injustice such as socioeconomic and political, sexual, racial, and international inequalities are explored. Class relations within the United States are compared with class and caste relations in other societies. Inequalities between societies are also examined.

SOC 336-Social Theory (3): Exploration of how different world views and theoretical analyses make sense of society, politics, economy, social institutions, and social change. A critical examination and comparison of the thoughts of social thinkers such as Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and contemporary sociologists. Various sociological theories such as conflict, structural-functionalism, and symbolic interactionism are compared and contrasted. Core course for majors and minors.

SOC 359 – Introduction to Human Services (3): The course introduces the purpose, sanctions, values, knowledge, and methods used in Human Service Fields.  We use readings and hand on exercises to explore how human service workers aim to discover truths about individuals, communities, and society.  You, as a student, will eventually utilize a generalist perspective to understand human life in all its variations.  The goal is to understand that we must strive to accurately describe and explain social behaviors and their meanings and ways to curb human suffering.

SOC 387/487- Internship (1-6): Field experience in sociology or criminal justice. Consent of department chairperson required.

UDCM 105-General, Organic, and Biochemistry (3) and Lab (1): This course covers the basic concepts of general, organic, and biochemistry. Through lecture and small group work, students will learn how to apply molecular theory; interpret reaction processes; evaluate solution behavior; compare functional groups; and analyze biological compounds. Upon completion of this course students will also be able to discuss how chemistry affects our lives. Mastery of course content will be demonstrated by students through exams, presentations, and written reports. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: UDMA 112 recommended. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

UDHS 121 -- World Civilization I (3): Beginnings (3500 B.C.- 1600 A.D.): The four major world civilizations are described: Middle Eastern, European, Indian and Chinese. Also considers questions of ethics arising from world history. This course fulfills the Global Awareness A requirement.

UDHS 212-U.S. History Since 1865 (3): Surveys the development of modern America from the end of the Civil War to the present, emphasizing trends of contemporary significance.

UDIN 115-World Geography (3): Helps students develop their knowledge of place-name geography. Students deal with the basic questions of geography – where is it, what is it like, and why there? Students also are asked to study the relevance of certain locations and examine the linkages that may exist. The course material deals tangentially with numerous other disciplines as it describes, analyzes, and explains the places and patterns of the world. This course fulfills the Global Awareness A requirement.

UDLS 111 – Elementary Spanish I (3): The course is designed for students with no previous training in the language. It deals with fundamental principles of grammar, vocabulary, writing, and cultural awareness. This course fulfills the Global Awareness B requirement.

UDLS 112-Elementary Spanish II (3): A continuation of UDLS 111. Designed to increase the student’s knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, and writing skills. All lectures emphasize Hispanic cultural awareness. This course fulfills the Global Awareness B requirement.

UDMA 030-Intro to Algebra (2): This course is designed to develop the student’s basic skills in mathematical operations. It begins at the most elementary level with a review of computations involving whole numbers, integers, fractions, and decimals. These same topics are incorporated in units on linear equations and inequalities, linear applications and ratio/proportion/percent applications. This course does not count for general education credit in the natural sciences and does not satisfy the mathematics literacy requirement.

UDMA 040-Intermediate Algebra (3): This course is designed to build further skills in mathematics. Course topics include basic properties and definitions of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities in one variable, exponents and polynomials, factoring, rational, expressions and equations, rational exponents and roots, quadratic equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities. This course does not count for general education credit in the natural sciences and does not satisfy the mathematics literacy requirement. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in UDMA 030 or consent of instructor

UDMA 112-Algebra (4):  This course develops skills in algebra. Topics include linear equations and inequalities in one and two variables, absolute value equations and inequalities, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations, factoring, quadratic equations and inequalities, functions, conic sections, polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic equations and systems of equations. Prerequisites: a minimum of one year of high school algebra (with a grade of B or better), a grade of C or better in UDMA 040 or UDMA 111 or consent of the instructor. This course fulfills the General Education requirement.

UDMS 111 - Music Appreciation (3): A survey of musical styles and trends from the 17th century to the present. Designed to encourage and aid the general student in music listening. Not available for credit to music majors. This course fulfills the Aesthetics B requirement.

UDTH 105 – Theatre Appreciation (3): Understanding how a play production is crafted can make attending performances of many kinds much more enjoyable and educational.  In this introductory course, students will learn what it takes to make a play production, and how action makes meaning in time and space.  Students will attend a variety of theatre performances to experience the broadest range available in style, purpose, and context.   We may analyze the plays attended for meaning that can directly inform theatrical production and performance values.   A play is a process rather than a thing. It takes many steps for a dramatic idea to travel a path from the mind of the playwright, through conceptualization by the director, through the collective imagination of the production team, all the way to the experience of the audience.  Course includes a class trip to Chicago to experience theatre firsthand. This course fulfills the Aesthetics B requirement.

UDTH 359 - Screwball Comedy and Film Noir (3): This course will introduce students to two original, and starkly contrasting, American film genres, screwball comedy and film noir. Both forms flourished during the first half of the twentieth century and continue to exercise an outsize influence on American and world cinema. In addition to learning the history and conventions of the genres, students will also study the technical and artistic workings of cinema. We will underline the connection between analyzing our experiences of film and a richer, more sophisticated enjoyment of it. No prior study of film is required; popcorn is encouraged. This course fulfills the Aesthetics B requirement.

WorldView Seminar II: Self and Society (3): Students take WorldView Seminar II: Self and Society after completion of WVS I. In this interdisciplinary experiential learning format, students and faculty address significant issues that challenge contemporary American culture. We analyze these issues and discuss how our values and faith shape our responses to them. This course focuses on the themes of citizenship, social values and vocation.  This course fulfills the WorldView 2 requirement.

 Graduate Course Descriptions

BUS 616 - Organizational Structures (3): Focuses on organizational designs and the integration of strategy, structure, and processes necessary for an organization’s survival. Complexity of design ranges from individual business units to multiple interdependent operating units, and ultimately, large multidivisional and multinational organizations.

BUS 617 - Human Capital Management (3): Concentrates on relating human capital to business objectives. Focuses on acquiring, developing, managing and rewarding human capital in an organization to achieve optimal productivity and enhance knowledge by creating and using talent.  The role of values and culture in an organization is also examined. 

BUS 624 - Global Marketing (3): Emphasizes and develops the basic proficiencies of global marketing to enhance business growth. Analysis of fundamental strategies for use in formulating knowledgeable decisions in a global environment.

BUS 652 - Problem Solving (3): Focuses on and underscores the key strategies and tactics for managing conflicts and crises in a global business environment. Crisis management skills are developed and applied to problem solving in a global content. Crisis management templates are developed and utilized in conjunction with web resources. Trauma and post-incident management, disaster response, and business recovery, as well as components of an innovative learning organization are covered.

BUS 655 - Business Modeling (3): Outlines and emphasizes the formal integration of all disciplines into a business environment and the strategy needed to implement this integration.  Key topics include the nature of competitive advantage and the development and implementation of strategy.

BUS 693 - Professional Skills Practicum (3): Incorporates the core concepts of the business curriculum into a final capstone project. Knowledge and skills acquired during the program are applied under faculty guidance within an approved framework. Students are encouraged to individualize their culminating experiences by developing and researching a global or experiential project. All projects require an application component.

COM 625 - Mediated Document Design (3): Examines how information technologies affect communication in a variety of settings and for different purposes. This course focuses on learning and applying principles of document design for use in mediated contexts. With an emphasis on audience, purpose, and context, students learn to use visual communication theory in planning, designing, and revising effective print and on-line documents for domestic and international recipients.

COM 640 - Public Relations (3): Examines the history of the profession, characteristics, skills, and ethics required of a public relations practitioner, and necessary communication methods to engage in the two-way dialogue between an organization and its targeted publics. Students develop a baseline knowledge of public relations strategies and techniques.

COM 659 - Topics – Strategic Planning (1): Strategic planning is an important tool used to align an organization’s vision, mission, and long-term goals in a single cohesive document that ensures all stakeholders understand the purpose and future direction of the organization. Students will become familiar with the elements of an effective planning process and tools that can assist in formulating an effective strategic plan.

COM 659 - Topics – Listening to Leaders IV (1): Students will have an opportunity to be in conversation with respected leaders from the Tri-State area who will discuss their various experiences in matters such as leading change, responding to conflict, and experiences with “getting the right people in the right seats on the bus.”

COM 617- Human Capital Management (3): Concentrates on relating human capital to business objectives. Focuses on acquiring, developing, managing and rewarding human capital in an organization to achieve optimal productivity and enhance knowledge by creating and using talent.  The role of values and culture in an organization is also examined.

COM 654 - Problem Solving (3): Focuses on and underscores the key strategies and tactics for managing conflicts and crises in a global business environment. Crisis management skills are developed and applied to problem solving in a global content. Crisis management templates are developed and utilized in conjunction with web resources. Trauma and post-incident management, disaster response, and business recovery, as well as components of an innovative learning organization are covered.